Retirement Blindspots – Presented by Mark K. Lund, Financial Planner

Some life and financial factors that can sometimes be overlooked.

We all have our “blue sky” visions of the way retirement should be, yet our futures may unfold in ways we do not predict. So, as you think about your “second act,” you may want to consider some life and financial factors that can suddenly arise.

You may end up retiring earlier than you expect. If you leave the workforce at “full” retirement age (FRA), which is 67 for those born in 1960 and later, you may be eligible to claim “full” Social Security benefits. Working until 67 may be worthwhile because it will reduce your monthly Social Security benefits if you claim them between age 62 and your FRA.1

Now, do most Americans retire at 67? Not according to the annual survey from the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI).

In EBRI’s 2020 Retirement Confidence Survey, 16% of pre-retirees expected to retire between ages 66-69, and 31% thought they would retire at age 70 or later. The reality is different. In surveying current retirees, EBRI found that only 6% had worked into their seventies. In fact, 70% percent of them had left work before age 65, and 33% had retired before age 60.2

You may see retirement as an extension of the present rather than the future. This is only natural, as we all live in the present – but the future will arrive. The costs you have to shoulder later in retirement may exceed those at the start of retirement. As you may be retired for 20 or 30 years, it is wise to take a long-term view of things.

You may have a health insurance gap. If you retire before age 65, what do you do about health coverage? You may shoulder 100% of the cost.

Looking forward, you may need extended care, and it seems to get more expensive each year. Wealthy households may be able to “self-insure” against extended care, but many other households struggle. In Genworth’s 2020 Cost of Care Survey, the median monthly cost of a semi-private room in a nursing home is $7,738. In California, it is $9,023; in Florida, $8,803.3

Suppose you become disabled or seriously ill, and working is out of the question. How do you make ends meet?

Age may catch up to you sooner rather than later. You may stay fit, active, and mentally sharp for decades to come, but if you become mentally or physically infirm, you need to find people to trust to manage your finances.

You could be alone one day. As anyone who has ever lived alone realizes, a single person does not simply live on 50% of a couple’s income. Keeping up a house, or even a condo, can be tough when you are elderly. Driving can be a concern. If your spouse or partner is absent, will there be someone to help you in the future?

These are some of the blind spots that can surprise us in retirement. They may quickly affect our money and quality of life. If you age with an awareness of them, you may have the opportunity to manage the outcome better.

If you ever have any questions about your investments or retirement plans, please feel free to give me a call at 801-545-0696.

 

Citations
1. Social Security Administration, December 1, 2020
2. Employee Benefit Research Institute, December 1, 2020
3. Genworth Cost of Care Survey, March 30, 2020

This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. All economic and performance data is historical and not indicative of future results. Market indices discussed are unmanaged. Investors cannot invest in unmanaged indices. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This material was prepared by MarketingLibrary, Inc., for Mark Lund, Mark is known as a Wealth Advisor, The 401k Advisor, Investor Coach, Financial Advisor, Financial Planner, Investment Advisor and author of The Effective Investor. Mark offers investment advisory services through Stonecreek Wealth Advisors, Inc. a fiduciary, independent, fee-only, Registered Investment Advisor firm providing investment and retirement planning for individuals and 401k consulting for small businesses. Mark’s newsletter is called The Fiduciary Report. Cities served in Utah are: Salt Lake County, Utah County, Park City, Salt Lake City, Murray, West Jordan, Sandy, Draper, South Jordan, Provo, Orem, Lehi, Highland, Alpine, American Fork.

Category: Articles, Blog

About the Author ()

Mark K. Lund is the author of The Effective Investor, a #1 Best Seller, and founder of Stonecreek Wealth Advisors, Inc. an independent, fee-only, Registered Investment Advisory firm. He has provided articles for or been quoted in: The Wall Street Journal, The Salt Lake Tribune, The Enterprise Newspaper, The Utah Business Connect Magazine, US News & World Report, and Newsmax.com, just to name a few.  Mark publishes two newsletters called, “The Mark Lund Growth Report” and “Mark Lund on Money.”  Mark provides CPE (continuing professional education) courses for CPAs.  You may also have seen him on KUTV Channel 2, or as a guest speaker at a local association or business. Mark provides investment and retirement planning services for individuals and 401(k) consulting for small businesses. In his book, The Effective Investor, Mark exposes the false narrative magazines, media, big Wall Street firms, and most advisors want you to believe. The good news is that Mark will show you that you don’t need their speculative ways of investing in order to be a successful investor. Get a free copy when you schedule your initial consultation.

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